Omoluabi and the law

Hard Work and the Law

Like many other virtues and principles, the Omoluabi principle of hard work is one that is universally valued throughout cultures and generations. A good work ethic is a character trait that is applicable to any task or endeavour that one undertakes. Beyond this however it is almost universally the difference between what is nominal and what is excellent. Excellence, mastery and perfection do not come easily. They are not the fruits of a sluggard, and it is for that reason that they are so highly prized and valued.

This quality of hard work is integral to the legal system, particularly as it relates to court trials. Despite popular depictions as lawyers being naturally clever and skilled, the most successful parties in a courtroom are not necessarily the most intelligent or talented. They may not be the ones with the best educations or even the strongest cases. The factor that almost always makes the greatest difference in a courtroom setting will inevitably be the hard work and time spent by a party in thoroughly preparing a case.
Just like any other contest, the importance of hard work in the courtroom setting cannot be overstated. However, what makes it even more important are its beneficial effects. A conscientious and prepared lawyer can be the difference between a jail sentence and freedom. This can and regularly does have a dramatic effect on the life of the person before the court. Consequently, lawyers must and do work hard for the members of the public that they choose to represent. Countless hours are spent reviewing the case and understanding every seemingly insignificant detail to the point where it is nearly committed to memory.

Finally when all this done, the advocate enters the courtroom and presents the case as if it were completely natural, (but of course it was not). The rest of life is not unlike the courtroom. People in the various professions that have achieved virtuoso status do not happen upon it. Hard work is always at the foundation of success and excellence. It is an amazing quality to possess and cultivate. It is also integral to being an omoluabi.

Finally when all this done, the advocate enters the courtroom and presents the case as if it were completely natural, (but of course it was not). The rest of life is not unlike the courtroom. People in the various professions that have achieved virtuoso status do not happen upon it. Hard work is always at the foundation of success and excellence. It is an amazing quality to possess and cultivate. It is also integral to being an omoluabi.

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